Importer Responsibility (Part 2 of a Series)

Exporter/Shipper:

In this, the second in our series on Importer Responsibility, we will discuss how your Exporter/Shippers methods from start to finish can affect every step of your imports. This will help get your shipment expedited though all government agencies, warehouse release, freight release to truckers, and all billing. Remember as the importer of record you are responsible for all aspects of the import in the eyes of all the government agencies. We don’t want you to be in violation, incur any penalties or demurrage/storage charges because of late notification.

How well do you know your exporter/shipper?

It is very important that you strive to create a close, positive relationship with your exporter/shipper. There are so many things that can slow the process. All import shipments are on a time line from the exporting country to the final destination. Your ability to clearly communicate with your exporter/shipper will keep you ahead of the game. Timing is everything here.

For Air imports you will want to have your exporter/shipper provide you and your Customs Broker with the following:

  • Pre advice information at least 48 hours prior to shipping.

  • Legible copies of all import/shipping documents at least 24 hours prior to shipping.

  • Complete addresses for exporter/shipper, manufacture, packer (‘s) and or grower (‘s) and FDA registration numbers for shipments requiring FDA.

  • Contacts, phone/fax numbers and e-mail addresses.

  • You need to advise your exporter/shipper where to send all of this, e-mail is preferred or fax. Your broker will need to be copied on all of this too.

  • In the next e-blast we will discuss in more detail the required documentation for importing.

For Ocean imports you will want to have your exporter/shipper provide you and your Customs Broker with the following:

  • 10+2 (ISF) Pre advice information no later than 3 days prior to loading. Failure, late and inaccurate filings will be subject to penalties by Customs in the amount of $5000 per transaction.

  • Legible copies of all import/shipping documents no later than 5 days before arrival into the U.S.

  • Complete addresses for exporter/shipper, manufacture, packer (‘s) and or grower (‘s) and FDA registration numbers for shipments requiring FDA.

  • Contacts, phone/fax numbers and e-mail addresses.

  • You need to advise your exporter/shipper where to send all of this, e-mail is preferred or fax. Your broker will need to be copied on all of this too.

  • In the next e-blast we will discuss in more detail the required documentation for importing.

When do you want to let your Customs Broker know about your next shipment? Right now!

Importers are responsible for advising their Customs Broker in a timely manner. Again this is to get the flow of information going to the right place at the right time. We understand that logistics may impede some of the timing factors, but these outlines are a great guide. By giving your exporter/shipper the details on how to handle the flow of information, your imports may be expedited though every step on the time line. Following this guide can definitely maximize profitably and insure full compliance.

Posted in importer responsibility

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